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So let's say that you want to quit your day job and start making indie games. It's a noble pursuit to to be sure, and with Microsoft's Independent Developers @ Xbox program for Xbox One, it's supposedly pretty easy. What Redmond doesn't tell you, however, is just how much it'll cost you. That's where Jamie Fristrom, the developer behind Sixty Second Shooter Prime comes in. On his blog, Fristrom breaks how much everything from URL registration and maintenance ($19) to paying to have the game rated in foreign markets ($2,042) costs, with the total coming in at $5,143 -- a stark contrast to something like Destiny's $140 million price-tag. He notes that even with Redmond giving away free development kits, Xbox isn't the cheapest indie platform around but that the costs to publish there were "absolutely worth it." What's more, he says that if you choose to skip stuff like releasing in other territories, making a game for under $3,000 could be totally feasible. Good to know.

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Verizon's FiOS app has been leading the way on the Xbox One live-TV front, and now it's getting a handful more channels in its stable. If you're a subscriber, you now have access to the likes of AMC HD, Showtime, Encore, Bloomberg TV and ten others. As Verizon tells it, this brings the total channel count to 88 across both the Xbox 360 and its younger brother, the Xbox One. Whether you're going to use them to keep up with the exploits of the Ricktatorship or Homeland, however, is up to you.

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iPhone 5 and Galaxy S5

Samsung warned that its smartphone sales weren't that great this spring, and now we have the numbers to show just what the company meant. IDC estimates that Samsung's smartphone shipments saw a rare year-over-year drop in the second quarter, taking it from a lofty 32.3 percent market share down to 25.2 percent. That's still enough to give it a comfortable lead, but a shock for a company which is used to growth. The cause, analysts say, is the rapid rise of Chinese brands that cut directly into Samsung's low-end business. Huawei claimed 6.9 percent of the smartphone space after doubling its shipments, thanks in part to heavy discounts on phones like the Ascend P7; Lenovo jumped to 5.4 percent on the back of both budget phones at home as well as rapid expansion abroad.

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Google's hotel-based searches in action

When you land in a strange new city, your first instinct may be to see what there is to do near your hotel. However, searching Google for nearby attractions can be a hassle if you don't remember your hotel's name or address by heart. That memorization is no longer necessary after today, though -- Google has updated its search engine to use the booking confirmation in your Gmail as a locator. If you want to look for a late-night diner, all you have to do is ask Google to "show restaurants around my hotel." You can also get directions to or from your accommodations, so you should reach a welcoming bed (or your flight) just a little bit faster. The addition makes the most sense if you're using voice search in one of Google's mobile apps, but any traveler can give it a spin.

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Mark Zuckerberg's experiment in social network retail has finally come to an end: on August 12th, Facebook Gifts will close forever. The company's gift feature grew from its acquisition of the social gifting app Karma, selling teddy bears, socks and chocolates drop shipped directly to your Facebook friends. Eventually Facebook discovered that gift cards took the lion's share of sales and discontinued physical gifts altogether. Now the company says it's refocusing its resources on programs that help businesses increase sales through Facebook, rather than selling product themselves. So, in short, the "Buy" button is here to stay, but you'll have to enable your friends' Starbucks habit elsewhere.

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If you've ever gone running with earbuds, you'll be familiar with the condition "pushem-backin-itis." It's an affliction that troubles many music-loving joggers once they break a sweat. Some companies prescribe over-ear hooks, or "wing tips" to combat this; Skullcandy is taking a different approach. Its new "Method" and "The Chops" in-ear lines come with sensual "Stickygel" technology. No points for figuring out what that is. Skullcandy claims their proprietary bud gels are 30 percent more loving to your earlobes (well, the skin at least) than standard tips. We mean loving in the attachment sense of the word. The sensual part? The adhesive action only kicks in once you work up a sweat, so you've got to earn that affection. As per always with Skullcandy, there's a choice of colors and styles -- and at $30 for the Methods, the grabby part doesn't extend to your wallet, either.

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What happens when a physicist decides to become a chef? If they're anything like Manuel Linares, then you can expect a fusion of food and science to come out of their kitchen. For instance, one of the Spaniard's masterpieces is an ice cream that changes colors when you lick it. He calls it the Xamaleón, a play on the Spanish word for chameleon, and it originally starts as a periwinkle blue frozen treat until it's spritzed with Linares' "love elixir," a super secret mixture he concocted himself. This mixture reacts to changes in temperature and saliva, causing the tutti-frutti-flavored ice cream to turn into purple, then into pink as you lick.

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Almost as soon as news broke in February that Netflix had agreed to pay Comcast for a direct connection to its network, Verizon and AT&T were in line with their hands out as well. Verizon reached a deal months ago -- that so far has done little to resolve streaming issues -- and now Netflix and AT&T have confirmed that they reached an agreement in May, as first reported by Mashable. In a statement, they said the process of turning up the connections should take place "over the coming days." Netflix CEO Reed Hastings already laid out his disapproval of the ISPs and their policies, and more recently suggested that if the Comcast / Time Warner Cable merger goes through, the combined behemoth should be barred from charging for interconnects. We wouldn't be surprised to hear something similar about the proposed AT&T / DirecTV combo too, and with the FCC's recent statements on this issue we suspect things are far from settled.

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